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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
. >> they know they are short of their mandate on both counts. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive
did you do the deal? >> first of all, airtran brings us a number of things. they have a safe low cost high quality operation. they have a strong low fare brand. but most importantly, it provides us an opportunity to expand our route network. they fly places that we don't. we have very little overlapping routes. but notably, their largest operation is in atlanta. and we have no service to atlanta at all, as one example. it brings us more access to new york's laguardia airport, as well as first-time access for us to reagan national airport in washington d.c.. >> susie: where kelly, why did you do it now? >> i feel like we're ready now. first of all, things are so much better today than they were a year ago. our profit outlook is solid. we have plenty of cash on hand. we have a very strong balance sheet, with credit rating agencies affirming our credit rating today. so financially we're very well prepared for this. we also have a very strong leadership team. who is ready to add this major task to our list. and then we have the tools in place today that we just haven't had in the past to
, those are the two words president obama used today to describe the pace of growth in the u.s. economy. and the economy was a big topic at his white house news conference this morning. >> tom: the other big topic, susie, was the president's announcement of his new top economic advisor. he's austan goolsbee. goolsbee has been on the president's economic team. he now becomes chairman of the white house council of economic advisors, replacing christina romer, who left to return to teaching. >> susie: the president used today's press briefing to push his agenda for reviving the economy, from tax breaks to a small business jobs bill. washington bureau chief darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the president today acknowledged what many americans know too well-- economic progress has been painfully slow. still, he urged voters to stay the course this on election day. >> if it was just a referendum on whether we have made the progress we need to, then people around the country will say that we are not there yet. if the election is about the policies that are going to move us forward, versus the
is probably behind us. the concern about a double dip is over and that now we should take advantage of the favorable seasonals in particular now that the mid term elections will soon be over. >> tom: the blue chips surge nearly 200 points, closing out a fourth straight week to the upside. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 24. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. the bulls are back on wall street. tom, investors were enthusiastic on some encouraging economic news: orders in august for things like machinery and computers were stronger than expected. >> tom: susie, this is the fourth week in a row that the major stock averages were positive and in a big way. let's run down the numbers from today's action. the dow jumped almost 200 points. the nasdaq added 54 and the s&p 500 rose 24. those indexes were up roughly 2% eac
more buyers in the u.s. last month. sales rose 15% as it continues to see its american business grow. i went today to a mercedes dealership in union, new jersey, to find out what's driving those robust sales. it's an alphabet of success stories. "c" class, "e" class, "s" class, and even the s.l.s. no matter which mercedes it is, consumers are driving off with these luxury sedans. sales of the new e-class models are up 71% so far this year, and-- for all mercedes vehicles sold in the u.s.-- up more than 22%. the c.e.o. of mercedes u.s.a. expects business for the german automaker will stay in the fast lane. >> i think we'll be able to keep that pace. we were hoping for a little bit of an increase, but we're happy if it stays on that level. there is a good chance it will. but we'll have to wait and see what september brings. >> susie: ernst, in this type economy, how is it consumers can buy a new car, let alone a mercedes. >> i think a lot of people are at the point where they do need a new car. they're hesitant, but they need it, and they're looking around and looking for good value and n
investment strategist sam stovall says investors are less worried about the u.s. slipping into another recession. >> we're getting better than expected economic data which is making investors believe that we are now moving further and further from the deflation and double digit precipice and as a result that pushed share prices out of the 100 point range we've been experienced since april of this year and now i believe from a technical perspective we're going to challenge that april 23rd high. >> susie: while stocks are having a break out september, the housing market remains stalled. fewer new homes were sold than expected in august, confirming that housing has yet to recover. purchases were unchanged, matching july as the second worst month since 1968. as suzanne pratt reports, it could be 2012 before housing market conditions get back to normal. >> reporter: at halstead property in hoboken new jersey, there's only one word to describe business: inconsistent. a stone's throw from manhattan's stronger real estate market hoboken offers buyers everything from modern condos to historic b
>> susie: president obama says more needs to be done to boost the u.s. economy-- a lot more. >> the hole the recession left was huge, and progress has been painfully slow. millions of americans are still looking for work. >> tom: he defended his push for an extension of middle class tax cuts, and said extending tax cuts for the wealthy just doesn't make sense. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. "painfully slow." tom, those are the two words president obama used today to describe the pace of growth in the u.s. economy. and the economy was a big topic at his white house news conference this morning. >> tom: the other big topic, susie, was the president's announcement of his new top economic ad
for joining us for this labor day special edition. the jobs picture just keeps getting worse. tom, back in january, the economy was adding jobs and the recovery was gaining momentum. then europe's debt woes exploded and the global recovery came to a grinding halt. >> tom: susie, the latest employment numbers aren't much help. 54,000 jobs disappeared from u.s. payrolls in august, and the unemployment rate hit 9.6 >> susie: so how bad is the employment picture, and how long will it take to get back to where we were before the recession started? suzanne pratt puts it in perspective. >> reporter: it seems lately that signs like these are extremely hard to come by. even though the great recession may technically be over, the labor market is far from recovered. the nation's unemployment rate hit 10% late last year and has hovered just below there ever since. but economist dan greenhaus says that widely quoted number understates the magnitude of the job crisis and the inequalities within it. >> if you're an advanced degree white guy working not in construction, you're fine. it's like 4.5%. it'
sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. the nation's retailers had a relatively strong back-to-school selling season, and susie, that has investors and traders wondering how the sector will do this holiday season. >> susie: tom, the commerce department reports retail sales rose for the second straight month in august. sales were up a better-than- expected four-tenths of a percent last month, while july's sales were also revised higher. >> tom: with "back to school" in the rear view mirror, retailers are looking ahead to the holiday selling season. many stores are deciding now how many temporary workers to hire, if any. as erika miller explains, those decisions can provide some important hints about the strength of holiday sales. >> reporter: in brooklyn, under the manhattan bridge, is a gift shop called stewart/stand. it's a family-owned business-- penelope runs the store, while her brother-in-law paul is in charge of the wholesale division. though it's only september, the two are already finalizing holiday hiring decisions. >> i would suggest probably gathering
what high cholesterol is or how many visits and says, "use good medical management," well, that's an open-ended and very debatable question. >> reporter: also debatable? how disruptive the new law will be. already, insurers including aetna, cigna and humana say they will stop selling plans that cover only children. since they can't limit pre- existing conditions, insurers worry parents will wait until after kids are sick to buy coverage. and this is only the beginning. most of the big changes don't kick in until 2012, including new purchasing pools and the requirement for everyone to have insurance. florida insurance commissioner kevin mccarty expects lots of changes between now and then. >> some companies are going to be deciding whether to stay in the market. we obviously like to see a conservative approach to keep as many people in the marketplace as possible. >> reporter: while there is a lot of uncertainty in the implementation of the health care law, there's also uncertainty about the law itself. florida is one of 20 states suing to block the health care law, and many repu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)